Dance Opera


 

Premiere
GREEN TIME
Chamber opera
Daniel Galay – composer and libretto

Tal Shahar – stage director
Tom Idelson – choreography and dancer
Polina Adamov –scenography  and costumes
Claudia Gutbetzahl-Levi – soprano
Alon Harari –contra-tenor
Igor Tavrovskiy - baritone

Liza Osborn  - dancer
Noa Cohen  - dancer

Hagar Shahal  - flute and piccolo
Nava Aminoff – clarinet and bass clarinet
Pole Keidar – violin
Maria Golberg  - harp
Tzvi Joffe - vibraphone and percussion
Alla Dantzig – piano

Liz Silman – producer
Hannah  Neeman-Galay – production adviser
Shosh Wasserman - poster  and program design

Thanks
Rachela Liberman  coordinator Vaadat Haarbaa
Elisar Shen Tzur, Director Rozin Center
Bogen Family  for the paintings of Alexander Bogen

About Dance Opera
I decided to call this genre DanceOpera since the dance component in this particular work is of equal weight to the other  components associated with the opera, like singers and instrumentalists. I have been composing musical works for the stage since the seventies, and it has always been a main concern interest for me how to integrate the dance dimension as an organic component with all the other stage components. In Summer 2010, When I started to think about my new work Green Time, I was determined to build the libretto in such a way that the dance factor would act as the motor of the events – an inseparable component of the new opera, the Danceopera.
Another artistic decision was the multi-media use of Improvisation techniques within the musical score of this danceopera. There are many reasons for that. The first one comes from a deep conviction that the Art of Improvisation may be implemented in such complex stage adventure. However, there are other arguments such as the intention to notably reduce all costs associated with opera production, and a wish that the new danceopera would attract public interest by constantly providing fresh and up to date subjects.
Here is the place to add, that in the improvisational interaction game, each component ? dancers, singers, musicians?can take the overhand and initiate new ideas and motives that the other artists can assimilate and develop. It’s, of course, the role of the choreographer and director to exploit these interactions in the most fruitful and creative way.
According to this new aesthetics, each performer becomes also a total artist, because in addition to his specialization field, she is expected to act, even partially, also as an artist in a correlated field. The borders between the art fields would not be strict as in traditional opera: instrumentalists and singers may dance, and dancers may produce sounds, all according to the needs and directions of the plot.  D. G.




GREENTIME

Daniel Galay
Danceopera, 2010
Duration: 45'


About the genre
I decided to call this genre danceopera since the dance component in this particular work is of equal weight to the other  components associated with the opera, like singers and instrumentalists. I have been composing musical works for the stage since the seventies, and it has always been a main concern interest for me how to integrate the dance dimension as an organic component with all the other stage components. In Summer 2010, When I started to think about my new work Green Time, I was determined to build the libretto in such a way that the dance factor would act as the motor of the events – an inseparable component of the new opera, the Danceopera.
Another artistic decision was the multi-media use of Improvisation techniques within the musical score of this danceopera. There are many reasons for that. The first one comes from a deep conviction that the Art of Improvisation may be implemented in such complex stage adventure. However, there are other arguments such as the intention to notably reduce all costs associated with opera production, and a wish that the new danceopera would attract public interest by constantly providing fresh and up to date subjects.
Here is the place to add, that in the improvisational interaction game, each component ? dancers, singers, musicians?can take the overhand and initiate new ideas and motives that the other artists can assimilate and develop. It’s, of course, the role of the choreographer and director to exploit these interactions in the most fruitful and creative way.
According to this new aesthetics, each performer becomes also a total artist, because in addition to his specialization field, she is expected to act, even partially, also as an artist in a correlated field. The borders between the art fields would not be strict as in traditional opera: instrumentalists and singers may dance, and dancers may produce sounds, all according to the needs and directions of the plot. D. G.
 

 

 
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